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Phoretic Behavior of the Broad Mite Polyphagotarsonemus latus [abstract]
Year:
2003
Source of publication :
Phytoparasitica
Authors :
Bahar, Ofir
;
.
Palevsky, Eric
;
.
Reneh, Saadia
;
.
Soroker, Victoria
;
.
Yablonski, Sara
;
.
Volume :
31
Co-Authors:
Facilitators :
From page:
316
To page:
316
(
Total pages:
1
)
Abstract:

The broad mite Polyphagotarsonemus latus (Acari: Tarsonemidae) is a polyphagous pest in tropical and subtropical regions, especially in greenhouse crops, which increases the significance of the studies on its dispersal. Phoretic associations between broad mite and whiteflies have been reported from different parts of the world, suggesting the significance of phoresy in mite dispersal and management. The trapping of both windborne and phoretic broad mites has been the subject of comparison under field conditions. The nature of cues involved in the recognition of the phoretic host by the mite has been studied under laboratory conditions. The role of the wax powder typical of whiteflies on phoretic host recognition has been evaluated by monitoring mite attachment to prewashed Bemisia tabaci and by studying the mite response to wax collected from Aleuroides singularis. Under field conditions, most trapped broad mites were attached to whiteflies. In the laboratory, broad mite attachment to B. tabaci took place equally well in the dark and under light. Mites did not differentiate between the sexes of their host. However, mite attachment to B. tabaci was greatly diminished by washing the host with various organic solvents, especially chloroform. Broad mites were attracted to the leaf areas treated with wax of A. singularis and even attached to wax-treated leaf trichomes in a similar manner observed with their phoretic host. Taken together, these data indicate involvement of chemical cues from whitefly wax in the recognition process of the phoretic host and/or in the induction of the attachment behavior. (L)

Note:
Related Files :
Acari
Broad mite
insect behavior
insects
pests
Phoresy
plant protection
Polyphagotarsonemus latus
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Related Content
More details
DOI :
Article number:
0
Affiliations:
Database:
Publication Type:
Abstract
;
.
Conference paper
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
55701
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
22/07/2021 07:40
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Scientific Publication
Phoretic Behavior of the Broad Mite Polyphagotarsonemus latus [abstract]
31
Phoretic Behavior of the Broad Mite Polyphagotarsonemus latus

The broad mite Polyphagotarsonemus latus (Acari: Tarsonemidae) is a polyphagous pest in tropical and subtropical regions, especially in greenhouse crops, which increases the significance of the studies on its dispersal. Phoretic associations between broad mite and whiteflies have been reported from different parts of the world, suggesting the significance of phoresy in mite dispersal and management. The trapping of both windborne and phoretic broad mites has been the subject of comparison under field conditions. The nature of cues involved in the recognition of the phoretic host by the mite has been studied under laboratory conditions. The role of the wax powder typical of whiteflies on phoretic host recognition has been evaluated by monitoring mite attachment to prewashed Bemisia tabaci and by studying the mite response to wax collected from Aleuroides singularis. Under field conditions, most trapped broad mites were attached to whiteflies. In the laboratory, broad mite attachment to B. tabaci took place equally well in the dark and under light. Mites did not differentiate between the sexes of their host. However, mite attachment to B. tabaci was greatly diminished by washing the host with various organic solvents, especially chloroform. Broad mites were attracted to the leaf areas treated with wax of A. singularis and even attached to wax-treated leaf trichomes in a similar manner observed with their phoretic host. Taken together, these data indicate involvement of chemical cues from whitefly wax in the recognition process of the phoretic host and/or in the induction of the attachment behavior. (L)

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