G. Mittelman, H. Mamane, A. Kribus

The conversion efficiency from sunlight to electricity, for both solar thermal and solar photovoltaic converters, is usually in the range of 10—30%. More than two thirds of the solar energy, collected with considerable effort and capital investment, is rejected back to the environment. We present an analysis of novel spectral beam splitting systems with the applications of cogeneration and photochemical conversion. Significant advantages of these designs include (i) separate conversion mechanism for different radiation wavebands, such that typical efficiency limits are eliminated (ii) introduction of photochemical reactions driven by short waves, reducing photovoltaic thermalization losses and (iii) simple design with small number of elements and without a high level of radiation concentration, eliminating the requirements for accurate optics and active cooling. The results are very promising, with a considerable enhancement of the efficiency relative to photovoltaic and other reference plants.

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Innovative Solar Spectral Beam Splitting Concepts: Cogeneration and Photochemistry
35th meeting

G. Mittelman, H. Mamane, A. Kribus

Innovative Solar Spectral Beam Splitting Concepts: Cogeneration and Photochemistry

The conversion efficiency from sunlight to electricity, for both solar thermal and solar photovoltaic converters, is usually in the range of 10—30%. More than two thirds of the solar energy, collected with considerable effort and capital investment, is rejected back to the environment. We present an analysis of novel spectral beam splitting systems with the applications of cogeneration and photochemical conversion. Significant advantages of these designs include (i) separate conversion mechanism for different radiation wavebands, such that typical efficiency limits are eliminated (ii) introduction of photochemical reactions driven by short waves, reducing photovoltaic thermalization losses and (iii) simple design with small number of elements and without a high level of radiation concentration, eliminating the requirements for accurate optics and active cooling. The results are very promising, with a considerable enhancement of the efficiency relative to photovoltaic and other reference plants.

Scientific Publication