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Identification of a wild carrot as carrot psylla (Bactericera trigonica) attractant and host plant chemistry
Year:
2021
Source of publication :
Plant Science
Authors :
Ibdah, Mwafaq
;
.
Yahyaa, Mosaab
;
.
Volume :
311
Co-Authors:

Liora Shaltiel-Harpaz
Mosaab Yahyaa
Bhagwat Nawade
Natalia Dudareva
Mwafaq Ibdah

Facilitators :
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Total pages:
1
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Abstract:

Carrot psylla is one of the devastating pests of carrot throughout northern Europe and the Mediterranean basin. Here we characterized the behavioral response of psylla females towards different carrot germplasm and identified the chemical cues involved in the host selection of psylla females by oviposition choice experiments and metabolic profiling of leaf volatiles. In choice assays, carrot psylla displayed differential responses to tested 14 germplasm. Among germplasm, wild accessions 21793 and 20465 were highly preferred by carrot psylla, while wild accessions 20465 and the orange cultivar Nairobi were less. In non-choice experiments conducted only with this four-germplasm revealed that the carrot psylla females gave higher preference to the Nairobi and wild accession 20465, indicating the vicinity to other host plants in the same area might affect female preference.

Moreover, the nymph development and survival experiments showed the lowest nymphs survival rate on the wild accessions 21793 and 20497. Furthermore, the volatile emissions among different carrot cultivars infested with psylla showed qualitative and quantitative differences versus intact plants. Among these volatiles, apiol, β-asarone, myristicin, and sabinene showed a relationship with psyllas growth and survival. We also showed that myristicin and sabinene exogenous applications caused a dramatic reduction in the number of eggs laid by psylla and subsequent nymph survival. This is an initial study of the volatiles that mediate attraction and oviposition preference of carrot psylla in response to its host plant. The results from this study provide baseline information for the development of new control strategies against carrot psylla.

Note:
Related Files :
Bactericera trigonica
Carrot psylla
Trap plant
Volatile compounds
Wild carrot accession
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More details
DOI :
10.1016/j.plantsci.2021.111011
Article number:
111011
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
article
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
55908
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
15/08/2021 20:45
You may also be interested in
Scientific Publication
Identification of a wild carrot as carrot psylla (Bactericera trigonica) attractant and host plant chemistry
311

Liora Shaltiel-Harpaz
Mosaab Yahyaa
Bhagwat Nawade
Natalia Dudareva
Mwafaq Ibdah

Identification of a wild carrot as carrot psylla (Bactericera trigonica) attractant and host plant chemistry

Carrot psylla is one of the devastating pests of carrot throughout northern Europe and the Mediterranean basin. Here we characterized the behavioral response of psylla females towards different carrot germplasm and identified the chemical cues involved in the host selection of psylla females by oviposition choice experiments and metabolic profiling of leaf volatiles. In choice assays, carrot psylla displayed differential responses to tested 14 germplasm. Among germplasm, wild accessions 21793 and 20465 were highly preferred by carrot psylla, while wild accessions 20465 and the orange cultivar Nairobi were less. In non-choice experiments conducted only with this four-germplasm revealed that the carrot psylla females gave higher preference to the Nairobi and wild accession 20465, indicating the vicinity to other host plants in the same area might affect female preference.

Moreover, the nymph development and survival experiments showed the lowest nymphs survival rate on the wild accessions 21793 and 20497. Furthermore, the volatile emissions among different carrot cultivars infested with psylla showed qualitative and quantitative differences versus intact plants. Among these volatiles, apiol, β-asarone, myristicin, and sabinene showed a relationship with psyllas growth and survival. We also showed that myristicin and sabinene exogenous applications caused a dramatic reduction in the number of eggs laid by psylla and subsequent nymph survival. This is an initial study of the volatiles that mediate attraction and oviposition preference of carrot psylla in response to its host plant. The results from this study provide baseline information for the development of new control strategies against carrot psylla.

Scientific Publication
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