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It takes two: Reciprocal scion-rootstock relationships enable salt tolerance in 'Hass' avocado
Year:
2021
Source of publication :
Plant Science
Authors :
Ben-Gal, Alon
;
.
Dag, Arnon
;
.
Yasuor, Hagai
;
.
Yermiyahu, Uri
;
.
Volume :
312
Co-Authors:

Silit Lazare
Hagai Yasuor
Uri Yermiyahu
Anastasiya Kuhalskaya
Yariv Brotman
Alon Ben-Gal
Arnon Dag

Facilitators :
From page:
0
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Total pages:
1
)
Abstract:

Commercial avocado orchards typically consist of composite trees. Avocado is salt-sensitive, suffering from substantial growth and production depreciation when exposed to high sodium and chloride levels. Salt ions penetrate the roots and are subsequently transferred to the foliage. Hence, understanding distinct physiological responses of grafted avocado plant organs to salinity is of great interest. We compared the ion, metabolite and lipid profiles of leaves, roots and trunk drillings of mature 'Hass' scion grafted onto two different rootstocks during gradual exposure to salinity. We found that one rootstock, VC840, did not restrict the transport of irrigation solution components to the scion, leading to salt accumulation in the trunk and leaves. The other rootstock, VC152, functioned selectively, moderating the movement of toxic ions to the scion organs by accumulating them in the roots. The leaves of the scion grafted on the selective rootstock acquired the standard level of essential minerals without being exposed to excessive salt concentrations. However, this came with an energetic cost as the leaves transferred carbohydrates and storage lipids downward to the rootstock organs, which became a strong sink. We conclude that mutual scion–rootstock relationships enable marked tolerance to salt stress through selective ion transport and metabolic modifications.

Note:
Related Files :
Grafting
Ionome
lipidome
metabolome
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Related Content
More details
DOI :
10.1016/j.plantsci.2021.111048
Article number:
111048
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
article
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
56412
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
03/10/2021 17:40
Scientific Publication
It takes two: Reciprocal scion-rootstock relationships enable salt tolerance in 'Hass' avocado
312

Silit Lazare
Hagai Yasuor
Uri Yermiyahu
Anastasiya Kuhalskaya
Yariv Brotman
Alon Ben-Gal
Arnon Dag

It takes two: Reciprocal scion-rootstock relationships enable salt tolerance in 'Hass' avocado

Commercial avocado orchards typically consist of composite trees. Avocado is salt-sensitive, suffering from substantial growth and production depreciation when exposed to high sodium and chloride levels. Salt ions penetrate the roots and are subsequently transferred to the foliage. Hence, understanding distinct physiological responses of grafted avocado plant organs to salinity is of great interest. We compared the ion, metabolite and lipid profiles of leaves, roots and trunk drillings of mature 'Hass' scion grafted onto two different rootstocks during gradual exposure to salinity. We found that one rootstock, VC840, did not restrict the transport of irrigation solution components to the scion, leading to salt accumulation in the trunk and leaves. The other rootstock, VC152, functioned selectively, moderating the movement of toxic ions to the scion organs by accumulating them in the roots. The leaves of the scion grafted on the selective rootstock acquired the standard level of essential minerals without being exposed to excessive salt concentrations. However, this came with an energetic cost as the leaves transferred carbohydrates and storage lipids downward to the rootstock organs, which became a strong sink. We conclude that mutual scion–rootstock relationships enable marked tolerance to salt stress through selective ion transport and metabolic modifications.

Scientific Publication
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