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Development of a reliable screening technique for determining tolerance to Macrophomina phaseolina in strawberry
Year:
2020
Authors :
Dai, Nir
;
.
Freeman, Stanley
;
.
Maymon, Marcel
;
.
Volume :
157
Co-Authors:
  • Bar Pickel
  • Nir Dai
  • Marcel Maymon
  • Meirav Elazar
  • Zecharia Tanami
  • Omer Frenkel
  • Mohamed A. Toamy
  • Neta Mor
  • Stanley Freeman 

Show authors

Facilitators :
From page:
707
To page:
718
(
Total pages:
12
)
Abstract:

Macrophomina phaseolina is a typical soilborne fungal pathogen causing crown and root rot in strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa Duch.) worldwide. M. phaseolina has become a major problem for strawberry growers parallel to the phase-out of methyl-bromide since 2004 and is considered the most destructive soilborne pathogen of strawberry since then. Global warming is characterized by extreme weather conditions, in the Mediterranean area, as reflected by long, hot, dry summers without rain and relatively short, cold rainy winters. This together with regulatory restrictions on toxic fumigants creates favorable conditions for M. phaseolina to thrive. Screening for resistant germplasm is currently the most effective and sustainable approach for managing the disease. In order to screen for susceptible/tolerant strawberry cultivars, various inoculation techniques were assessed on five strawberry cultivars. Artificial inoculation of growth medium with naturally infected plant material and the use of the ‘toothpick’ method resulted in no significant differences. However, the use of artificially produced sclerotia in a soil mix at concentrations of 2.5 × 103 sclerotia/g soil exhibited differential cultivar mortality rates. High variation was found among 32 tested strawberry varieties (Israeli and US) grown under outdoor conditions in a screenhouse. Cultivars ‘Pelican’ (US), ‘Orly’, ‘Tamir’ and ‘Rotmy’ were considered tolerant compared to cultivars ‘Florida 90’ (US) and ‘Peles’ that were the most susceptible. The overall results indicate that the choice of certain Israeli and US cultivars may provide future germplasm for resistance breeding against M. phaseolina.

Note:
Related Files :
Charcoal rot
Inoculation techniques
Macrophomina phaseolina
Soilborne pathogens
Strawberry wilt
Show More
Related Content
More details
DOI :
10.1007/s10658-020-02051-4
Article number:
0
Affiliations:
Database:
Google Scholar
Publication Type:
article
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
57052
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
24/11/2021 17:46
You may also be interested in
Scientific Publication
Development of a reliable screening technique for determining tolerance to Macrophomina phaseolina in strawberry
157
  • Bar Pickel
  • Nir Dai
  • Marcel Maymon
  • Meirav Elazar
  • Zecharia Tanami
  • Omer Frenkel
  • Mohamed A. Toamy
  • Neta Mor
  • Stanley Freeman 

Show authors

Development of a reliable screening technique for determining tolerance to Macrophomina phaseolina in strawberry

Macrophomina phaseolina is a typical soilborne fungal pathogen causing crown and root rot in strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa Duch.) worldwide. M. phaseolina has become a major problem for strawberry growers parallel to the phase-out of methyl-bromide since 2004 and is considered the most destructive soilborne pathogen of strawberry since then. Global warming is characterized by extreme weather conditions, in the Mediterranean area, as reflected by long, hot, dry summers without rain and relatively short, cold rainy winters. This together with regulatory restrictions on toxic fumigants creates favorable conditions for M. phaseolina to thrive. Screening for resistant germplasm is currently the most effective and sustainable approach for managing the disease. In order to screen for susceptible/tolerant strawberry cultivars, various inoculation techniques were assessed on five strawberry cultivars. Artificial inoculation of growth medium with naturally infected plant material and the use of the ‘toothpick’ method resulted in no significant differences. However, the use of artificially produced sclerotia in a soil mix at concentrations of 2.5 × 103 sclerotia/g soil exhibited differential cultivar mortality rates. High variation was found among 32 tested strawberry varieties (Israeli and US) grown under outdoor conditions in a screenhouse. Cultivars ‘Pelican’ (US), ‘Orly’, ‘Tamir’ and ‘Rotmy’ were considered tolerant compared to cultivars ‘Florida 90’ (US) and ‘Peles’ that were the most susceptible. The overall results indicate that the choice of certain Israeli and US cultivars may provide future germplasm for resistance breeding against M. phaseolina.

Scientific Publication
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