Plant Physiology and Biochemistry

A. Silber 
T. Goldberg
O. Shapira
U. Hochberg

We assessed the effects of N fertigation regime on nutrient uptake and distribution in leaves and fruit of mango cv. Keitt grown in a lysimeter for four years. We applied three treatments: N1 – no N fertilization (less than 2 mg/L in the tap water); N2 – 10 mg/L N; and N3 – 20 mg/L N. Deficient N conditions (N1) resulted in low vegetation and fruit yield, high fruit:leaf ratio, high photosynthetic activity, high leaf P and K concentrations, as well as high sugar content and low acidity in the fruit. Excess N concentration (N3) enhanced vegetative growth and reduced fruit yield and gas exchange. The calculated annual nitrogen uptake heavily depended on the nitrogen supply, being highest for the N2 treatment (196 g/tree) as compared with the N1 (25 g/tree) or N3 (185 g/tree) treatments. Fruits were a major N sink being 82% (in N1), 26% (in N2), and 5% (in N3) of the total annual N supplied. The N accumulation rate in the fruit of the N1 and N2 treatment were above the N quantities supplied via fertigation, suggesting that N reserve in the vegetative tissues supplied the fruit's high N demand. These findings highlight the link between mango's N requirements and fruit yield, as well as the risks of excessive N fertilization.

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Nitrogen uptake and macronutrients distribution in mango (Mangifera indica L. cv. Keitt) trees
181

A. Silber 
T. Goldberg
O. Shapira
U. Hochberg

Nitrogen uptake and macronutrients distribution in mango (Mangifera indica L. cv. Keitt) trees

We assessed the effects of N fertigation regime on nutrient uptake and distribution in leaves and fruit of mango cv. Keitt grown in a lysimeter for four years. We applied three treatments: N1 – no N fertilization (less than 2 mg/L in the tap water); N2 – 10 mg/L N; and N3 – 20 mg/L N. Deficient N conditions (N1) resulted in low vegetation and fruit yield, high fruit:leaf ratio, high photosynthetic activity, high leaf P and K concentrations, as well as high sugar content and low acidity in the fruit. Excess N concentration (N3) enhanced vegetative growth and reduced fruit yield and gas exchange. The calculated annual nitrogen uptake heavily depended on the nitrogen supply, being highest for the N2 treatment (196 g/tree) as compared with the N1 (25 g/tree) or N3 (185 g/tree) treatments. Fruits were a major N sink being 82% (in N1), 26% (in N2), and 5% (in N3) of the total annual N supplied. The N accumulation rate in the fruit of the N1 and N2 treatment were above the N quantities supplied via fertigation, suggesting that N reserve in the vegetative tissues supplied the fruit's high N demand. These findings highlight the link between mango's N requirements and fruit yield, as well as the risks of excessive N fertilization.

Scientific Publication