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Sulfate Fertilization Preserves Tomato Fruit Nutritional Quality
Year:
2022
Source of publication :
Agronomy (Switzerland)
Authors :
Bar-Tal, Asher
;
.
Tietel, Zipora
;
.
Yermiyahu, Uri
;
.
Volume :
Co-Authors:

Zipora Tietel

Uri Yermiyahu

Asher Bar-Tal

 

Facilitators :
From page:
0
To page:
0
(
Total pages:
1
)
Abstract:

Sulfur is an essential mineral in human nutrition, involved in vital biochemical processes. Sulfur deficient soil is becoming a severe issue, resulting from increased agricultural production and decreased sulfur emissions. Tomato cultivation using sulfur-poor soils and desalinated water is becoming widespread, and might result in plant and fruit sulfur deficiency. In the current work, we aimed at evaluating the effect of sulfur fertilization (0.1–4 mM) on fruit sulfur concentrations, under both low (4 mM) and high (11 mM) nitrogen fertilization, to assess fruit sulfur biofortification, alongside the effect on fruit mineral composition, and on tomato plants. The experiment was performed on a semi-commercial scale, during two seasons, with a real-life fertilization range. We evaluated fruit elemental composition, in addition to young (diagnostic) leaves, as an indication to nutritional status. Our results show no harmful effect of low sulfur treatment on plant growth and high yield. Increased fertilization-sulfur exclusively induced sulfur accumulation in the fruit, while increasing fertilization-nitrogen subsequently increased fruit nitrogen. Sulfur treatments resulted in a consistent negative effect on fruit molybdenum and calcium, as well as a positive effect on fruit sodium levels. At the same time, other fruit minerals, including phosphorus, potassium, magnesium, iron, zinc, manganese, and copper, remained unaltered by sulfur treatments. Leaf response trends generally adhered to those of fruit. Taken together, our findings suggest that sulfur fertilization can biofortify tomato with sulfur while retaining fruit mineral composition and nutritional quality, excluding a decrease in Molybdenum levels, to assure food security and maintain fruit and vegetables as a significant source of sulfur and other minerals. Possibilities of practical application of this work’s results include optimization of fertilization levels in crop cultivation under sulfur deficiency for yield and nutritional quality, alongside the biofortification of tomatoes with sulfur and nitrogen with no adverse effect to other fruit minerals. 

Note:
Related Files :
Biofortification
Diagnostic leaves
Mineral Composition
Molybdenum
nitrate
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Related Content
More details
DOI :
10.3390/agronomy12051117
Article number:
0
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
article
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
59088
Last updated date:
29/05/2022 17:19
Creation date:
29/05/2022 17:18
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Scientific Publication
Sulfate Fertilization Preserves Tomato Fruit Nutritional Quality

Zipora Tietel

Uri Yermiyahu

Asher Bar-Tal

 

Sulfate Fertilization Preserves Tomato Fruit Nutritional Quality

Sulfur is an essential mineral in human nutrition, involved in vital biochemical processes. Sulfur deficient soil is becoming a severe issue, resulting from increased agricultural production and decreased sulfur emissions. Tomato cultivation using sulfur-poor soils and desalinated water is becoming widespread, and might result in plant and fruit sulfur deficiency. In the current work, we aimed at evaluating the effect of sulfur fertilization (0.1–4 mM) on fruit sulfur concentrations, under both low (4 mM) and high (11 mM) nitrogen fertilization, to assess fruit sulfur biofortification, alongside the effect on fruit mineral composition, and on tomato plants. The experiment was performed on a semi-commercial scale, during two seasons, with a real-life fertilization range. We evaluated fruit elemental composition, in addition to young (diagnostic) leaves, as an indication to nutritional status. Our results show no harmful effect of low sulfur treatment on plant growth and high yield. Increased fertilization-sulfur exclusively induced sulfur accumulation in the fruit, while increasing fertilization-nitrogen subsequently increased fruit nitrogen. Sulfur treatments resulted in a consistent negative effect on fruit molybdenum and calcium, as well as a positive effect on fruit sodium levels. At the same time, other fruit minerals, including phosphorus, potassium, magnesium, iron, zinc, manganese, and copper, remained unaltered by sulfur treatments. Leaf response trends generally adhered to those of fruit. Taken together, our findings suggest that sulfur fertilization can biofortify tomato with sulfur while retaining fruit mineral composition and nutritional quality, excluding a decrease in Molybdenum levels, to assure food security and maintain fruit and vegetables as a significant source of sulfur and other minerals. Possibilities of practical application of this work’s results include optimization of fertilization levels in crop cultivation under sulfur deficiency for yield and nutritional quality, alongside the biofortification of tomatoes with sulfur and nitrogen with no adverse effect to other fruit minerals. 

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