Advanced Search
Journal of Experimental Botany

Amit Shtern
Alexandra Keren-Keiserman
Jean-Philippe Mauxion
Chihiro Furumizu
John Paul Alvarez
Ziva Amsellem
Naama Gil
Etel Motenko
Sharon Alkalai-Tuvia
Elazar Fallik
Nathalie Gonzalez 
Alexander Goldshmidt

The pericarp is the predominant tissue determining the structural characteristics of most fruits. However, the molecular and genetic mechanisms controlling pericarp development remain only partially understood. Previous studies have identified that CLASS-II KNOX genes regulate fruit size, shape, and maturation in Arabidopsis thaliana and Solanum lycopersicum. Here we characterized the roles of the Solanum lycopersicum CLASS-II KNOX (TKN-II) genes in pericarp development via a detailed histological, anatomical, and karyotype analysis of the TKN-II mRNA-knockdown (35S:amiR-TKN-II) fruits. We identify that 35S:amiR-TKN-II pericarps contain more cells around their equatorial perimeter and fewer cell layers than the control. In addition, the cell sizes but not the ploidy levels of these pericarps were dramatically reduced. Further, we demonstrate that fruit shape and pericarp layer number phenotypes of the 35S:amiR-TKN-II fruits can be overridden by the procera mutant, known to induce a constitutive response to the plant hormone gibberellin. However, neither the procera mutation nor exogenous gibberellin application can fully rescue the reduced pericarp width and cell size phenotype of 35S:amiR-TKN-II pericarps. Our findings establish that TKN-II genes regulate tomato fruit anatomy, acting via gibberellin to control fruit shape but utilizing a gibberellin-independent pathway to control the size of pericarp cells.

Powered by ClearMash Solutions Ltd -
Volcani treasures
About
Terms of use
Solanum lycopersicum CLASS-II KNOX genes regulate fruit anatomy via gibberellin-dependent and independent pathways

Amit Shtern
Alexandra Keren-Keiserman
Jean-Philippe Mauxion
Chihiro Furumizu
John Paul Alvarez
Ziva Amsellem
Naama Gil
Etel Motenko
Sharon Alkalai-Tuvia
Elazar Fallik
Nathalie Gonzalez 
Alexander Goldshmidt

Solanum lycopersicum CLASS-II KNOX genes regulate fruit anatomy via gibberellin-dependent and independent pathways

The pericarp is the predominant tissue determining the structural characteristics of most fruits. However, the molecular and genetic mechanisms controlling pericarp development remain only partially understood. Previous studies have identified that CLASS-II KNOX genes regulate fruit size, shape, and maturation in Arabidopsis thaliana and Solanum lycopersicum. Here we characterized the roles of the Solanum lycopersicum CLASS-II KNOX (TKN-II) genes in pericarp development via a detailed histological, anatomical, and karyotype analysis of the TKN-II mRNA-knockdown (35S:amiR-TKN-II) fruits. We identify that 35S:amiR-TKN-II pericarps contain more cells around their equatorial perimeter and fewer cell layers than the control. In addition, the cell sizes but not the ploidy levels of these pericarps were dramatically reduced. Further, we demonstrate that fruit shape and pericarp layer number phenotypes of the 35S:amiR-TKN-II fruits can be overridden by the procera mutant, known to induce a constitutive response to the plant hormone gibberellin. However, neither the procera mutation nor exogenous gibberellin application can fully rescue the reduced pericarp width and cell size phenotype of 35S:amiR-TKN-II pericarps. Our findings establish that TKN-II genes regulate tomato fruit anatomy, acting via gibberellin to control fruit shape but utilizing a gibberellin-independent pathway to control the size of pericarp cells.

Scientific Publication
You may also be interested in