Advanced Search

Henryk Czosnek
Murad Ghanim

Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is one of the most studied complexes of begomoviruses. Once ingested by the whitefly Bemisia tabaci during feeding, TYLCV follows an established path: ingestion, stylet, food canal, esophagus, filter chamber, midgut (MG), hemolymph, salivary glands, and egestion. Most of the virus is concentrated in the MGs. Until not long ago, TYLCV was defined as a circulative, nonpropagative begomovirus. The results accumulated during the last decade have questioned this paradigm. They have opened many questions. Among them: (1) Are TYLCVs replicating and transcribed in their B. tabaci vector? (2) Are TYLCVs transovarially transmitted to the next generation of B. tabaci? (3) If TYLCVs replicate and are transmitted to progeny, then why only TYLCVs? To review these questions, we found it necessary to describe in broad lines the experimental conditions used by the authors to obtain their results and derive their interpretation. Indeed, different protocols may lead to contradictory results. Much of the recent results discussed here need to be repeated and confirmed, while opening new avenues of research.

Powered by ClearMash Solutions Ltd -
Volcani treasures
About
Terms of use
Chapter 15 - Replication and transovarial transmission of tomato yellow leaf curl virus in its whitefly vector: myth or reality?

Henryk Czosnek
Murad Ghanim

Chapter 15 - Replication and transovarial transmission of tomato yellow leaf curl virus in its whitefly vector: myth or reality?

Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is one of the most studied complexes of begomoviruses. Once ingested by the whitefly Bemisia tabaci during feeding, TYLCV follows an established path: ingestion, stylet, food canal, esophagus, filter chamber, midgut (MG), hemolymph, salivary glands, and egestion. Most of the virus is concentrated in the MGs. Until not long ago, TYLCV was defined as a circulative, nonpropagative begomovirus. The results accumulated during the last decade have questioned this paradigm. They have opened many questions. Among them: (1) Are TYLCVs replicating and transcribed in their B. tabaci vector? (2) Are TYLCVs transovarially transmitted to the next generation of B. tabaci? (3) If TYLCVs replicate and are transmitted to progeny, then why only TYLCVs? To review these questions, we found it necessary to describe in broad lines the experimental conditions used by the authors to obtain their results and derive their interpretation. Indeed, different protocols may lead to contradictory results. Much of the recent results discussed here need to be repeated and confirmed, while opening new avenues of research.

Scientific Publication
You may also be interested in