Alsharafa, K., Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants, Bielefeld University, , Bielefeld 33501, Germany.
Vogel, M.O.
Oelze, M.L.
Moore, M.
Stingl, N.
König, K.
Friedman, H.
Mueller, M.J.
Dietz, K.J.
High light acclimation depends on retrograde control of nuclear gene expression. Retrograde regulation uses multiple signalling pathways and thus exploits signal patterns. To maximally challenge the acclimation system, Arabidopsis thaliana plants were either adapted to 8 (low light (L-light)) or 80 μmol quanta m(-2) s(-1) (normal light (N-light)) and subsequently exposed to a 100- and 10-fold light intensity increase, respectively, to high light (H-light, 800 μmol quanta m(-2) s(-1)), for up to 6 h. Both L → H- and N → H-light plants efficiently regulated CO2 assimilation to a constant level without apparent damage and inhibition. This experimental set-up was scrutinized for time-dependent regulation and efficiency of adjustment. Transcriptome profiles revealed that N-light and L-light plants differentially accumulated 2119 transcripts. After 6 h in H-light, only 205 remained differently regulated between the L → H- and N → H-light plants, indicating efficient regulation allowing the plants to reach a similar transcriptome state. Time-dependent analysis of transcripts as markers for signalling pathways, and of metabolites and hormones as possibly involved transmitters, suggests that oxylipins such as oxophytodienoic acid and jasmonic acid, metabolites and redox cues predominantly control the acclimation response, whereas abscisic acid, salicylic acid and auxins play an insignificant or minor role.
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תנאי שימוש
Kinetics of retrograde signalling initiation in the high light response of Arabidopsis thaliana.
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Alsharafa, K., Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants, Bielefeld University, , Bielefeld 33501, Germany.
Vogel, M.O.
Oelze, M.L.
Moore, M.
Stingl, N.
König, K.
Friedman, H.
Mueller, M.J.
Dietz, K.J.
Kinetics of retrograde signalling initiation in the high light response of Arabidopsis thaliana.
High light acclimation depends on retrograde control of nuclear gene expression. Retrograde regulation uses multiple signalling pathways and thus exploits signal patterns. To maximally challenge the acclimation system, Arabidopsis thaliana plants were either adapted to 8 (low light (L-light)) or 80 μmol quanta m(-2) s(-1) (normal light (N-light)) and subsequently exposed to a 100- and 10-fold light intensity increase, respectively, to high light (H-light, 800 μmol quanta m(-2) s(-1)), for up to 6 h. Both L → H- and N → H-light plants efficiently regulated CO2 assimilation to a constant level without apparent damage and inhibition. This experimental set-up was scrutinized for time-dependent regulation and efficiency of adjustment. Transcriptome profiles revealed that N-light and L-light plants differentially accumulated 2119 transcripts. After 6 h in H-light, only 205 remained differently regulated between the L → H- and N → H-light plants, indicating efficient regulation allowing the plants to reach a similar transcriptome state. Time-dependent analysis of transcripts as markers for signalling pathways, and of metabolites and hormones as possibly involved transmitters, suggests that oxylipins such as oxophytodienoic acid and jasmonic acid, metabolites and redox cues predominantly control the acclimation response, whereas abscisic acid, salicylic acid and auxins play an insignificant or minor role.
Scientific Publication