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Social interactions regulate resource utilization in a Tephritidae fruit fly
Year:
2009
Source of publication :
Journal of Insect Physiology
Authors :
Nemny-Lavy, Esther
;
.
Nestel, David
;
.
Zur, Tamar
;
.
Volume :
55
Co-Authors:
Zur, T., Department of Entomology, Institute of Plant Protection, Agricultural Research Organization, Israel
Nemny-Lavy, E., Department of Entomology, Institute of Plant Protection, Agricultural Research Organization, Israel
Papadopoulos, N.T., Laboratory of Entomology and Applied Zoology, Department of Agriculture, Crop Production and Rural Environment, University of Thessaly, Volos, Greece
Nestel, D., Department of Entomology, Institute of Plant Protection, Agricultural Research Organization, Israel
Facilitators :
From page:
890
To page:
897
(
Total pages:
8
)
Abstract:
Previous studies have suggested that social interactions (e.g., the actions and reactions elicited by the interaction of co-specific individuals) induce individual fruit flies (Tephritidae) to ingest more food, especially protein-rich food. Changes in feeding behavior related to social interactions have been associated with reproduction (e.g., when different sexes are present), reproductive facilitation (e.g., when two females interact) and stress and aggression (e.g., flies of the same sex, or crowdedness). The present study investigated the effect of social interaction on the feeding, longevity and resource management of the Ethiopian fruit fly, Dacus ciliatus. Single flies and pairs of flies (of the same or different sexes) were confined to a small arena (the PUB system), in which we measured the amount of liquid food ingested daily by each fly. In addition, we sampled flies of different ages, extracted and quantified their lipid and protein contents, and related individual metabolic contents to the ingestion of a fructose and protein hydrolysate solution. Results showed that individual ingestion was significantly higher in flies maintained in pairs than in flies kept as solitary individuals. The highest intake rates were observed for the female-female pairs. In general, females ingested significantly greater volumes than males. Lipid contents tended to decrease progressively with age in flies kept as solitary individuals, especially in female flies, while lipid levels decreased and then increased in flies maintained in pairs. Protein trends were similar, although less pronounced than the patterns observed for the lipids. The flies kept as solitary individuals lived significantly longer than those kept in pairs. A resource-management analysis points to a decreased metabolic rate in flies kept as solitary individuals, as compared to paired flies. Results are discussed in view of theories of resource management and survival strategies. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Note:
Related Files :
Animal
animal communication
Animals
Dacus ciliatus
eating
Female
fly
Lipids
Male
resource use
Show More
Related Content
More details
DOI :
10.1016/j.jinsphys.2009.05.013
Article number:
Affiliations:
Database:
Scopus
Publication Type:
article
;
.
Language:
English
Editors' remarks:
ID:
27346
Last updated date:
02/03/2022 17:27
Creation date:
17/04/2018 00:30
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Scientific Publication
Social interactions regulate resource utilization in a Tephritidae fruit fly
55
Zur, T., Department of Entomology, Institute of Plant Protection, Agricultural Research Organization, Israel
Nemny-Lavy, E., Department of Entomology, Institute of Plant Protection, Agricultural Research Organization, Israel
Papadopoulos, N.T., Laboratory of Entomology and Applied Zoology, Department of Agriculture, Crop Production and Rural Environment, University of Thessaly, Volos, Greece
Nestel, D., Department of Entomology, Institute of Plant Protection, Agricultural Research Organization, Israel
Social interactions regulate resource utilization in a Tephritidae fruit fly
Previous studies have suggested that social interactions (e.g., the actions and reactions elicited by the interaction of co-specific individuals) induce individual fruit flies (Tephritidae) to ingest more food, especially protein-rich food. Changes in feeding behavior related to social interactions have been associated with reproduction (e.g., when different sexes are present), reproductive facilitation (e.g., when two females interact) and stress and aggression (e.g., flies of the same sex, or crowdedness). The present study investigated the effect of social interaction on the feeding, longevity and resource management of the Ethiopian fruit fly, Dacus ciliatus. Single flies and pairs of flies (of the same or different sexes) were confined to a small arena (the PUB system), in which we measured the amount of liquid food ingested daily by each fly. In addition, we sampled flies of different ages, extracted and quantified their lipid and protein contents, and related individual metabolic contents to the ingestion of a fructose and protein hydrolysate solution. Results showed that individual ingestion was significantly higher in flies maintained in pairs than in flies kept as solitary individuals. The highest intake rates were observed for the female-female pairs. In general, females ingested significantly greater volumes than males. Lipid contents tended to decrease progressively with age in flies kept as solitary individuals, especially in female flies, while lipid levels decreased and then increased in flies maintained in pairs. Protein trends were similar, although less pronounced than the patterns observed for the lipids. The flies kept as solitary individuals lived significantly longer than those kept in pairs. A resource-management analysis points to a decreased metabolic rate in flies kept as solitary individuals, as compared to paired flies. Results are discussed in view of theories of resource management and survival strategies. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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